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Relevant Theses

The Feasibility Study of Nitrate Reduction in Science Park Wastewater by Zero-Valent Iron

  • Engineer, AX Engineering Division: Chang Chen-Wei
  • Vice President, AX Engineering Division: Lin Shun-Hong
  • Deputy Manager, AX Engineering Division: Chen Rui-Bin
  • Chief Engineer, AX Engineering Division: Huang Jun-Qin
  • Deputy Chief Engineer, AX Engineering Division: Lu Li-An

- Abstract -

     In recent years, the problem of environmental pollution caused by nitrate compounds has been taken more seriously. When there is an abnormality in the science park wastewater, due to the high concentration and large discharge volume, the environmental impact will be most severe, therefore the Environmental Protection Administration announced the “Science Park Sewer Systems Effluent Standards” on October 22, 2012, and stipulated that the discharge standard for Nitrate Nitrogen as 50 mg/L. The purpose of the regulation is to urge the manufacturers at the source and the joint sewage treatment plants at the end to utilize physical, chemical, and biological methods actively to treat the nitrate nitrogen in the discharged wastewater to acceptable levels. In addition, when the wastewater treatment plants encounter unexpected incidents, such as poor treatment efficiency, then contingency plans should be formulated to ensure the rapid and efficient reduction of nitrate nitrogen concentration to prevent the excessive concentrations of nitrate nitrogen in discharged wastewater from causing health hazards.
     Many researches indicate that Zero-Valent Iron has been widely applied to reduce nitrate nitrogen in water as it has advantages such as relatively cheap material costs, low equipment footprint, ease of operation, and ease of maintenance, therefore this study used micrometer Zero-Valent Iron in the experiment with the laboratory prepared 50mg/L nitrate nitrogen solution, under the optimal conditions of pH 2, 100 g/L dosage, and 6 hours of stirring and reaction time, achieving a nitrate removal rate of more than 98%. In addition, through the experiments and comparisons with the influent and effluent water containing different nitrate nitrogen concentrations of the joint wastewater treatment plants, results show that even if the nitrate nitrogen concentration of the wastewater was originally as high as 150 mg/L, the removal rate is still higher than 70%. However, in this case, about 20%~40% of the nitrate removed will be converted to Ammonia Nitrogen, and as the reaction yields better results when conducted at low pH values, therefore the treatment plants should also monitor and treat the effluent to a pH value above 6 in addition to monitoring the nitrate nitrogen concentration of the treated wastewater to avoid violating the discharge standards.

A Study on the Removal of Ammonia Nitrogen in the Wastewater of Joint Wastewater Treatment Plants in the Science Parks Using the Magnesium Ammonium Phosphate (MAP) Method in Conjunction with the Central Composite Design and Response Surface Methodology

  • Engineer, AX Engineering Division: Lin Hou-Zhi
  • Vice President, AX Engineering Division: Lin Shun-Hong
  • Deputy Manager, AX Engineering Division: Chen Rui-Bin
  • Chief Engineer, AX Engineering Division: Huang Jun-Qin
  • Deputy Chief Engineer, AX Engineering Division: Lu Li-An

- Abstract -

     In order to reduce the environmental impacts caused by the ammonia nitrogen in industrial wastewater, the Environmental Protection Administration announced the “Science Park Sewer Systems Effluent Standards” on October 12, 2012, and implemented a two-phase restriction on ammonia nitrogen. The various science parks have responded by stipulating restriction limits and planning for the construction of biological nitrogen removal systems. To ensure that the effluent quality conforms to the ammonia nitrogen restriction limits completely, this study will further use the Magnesium Ammonium Phosphate (MAP) method to treat the ammonia nitrogen in the effluent of the joint wastewater treatment plants to provide a reference basis for the contingency plans in the event of water quality emergencies.
Through the exploring of operation parameters such as pH values, reaction time, and the mole ratio of PO43- and Mg2+, this study showed that the optimal reaction pH value is at 10.0 and the optimal reaction time is 30 minutes when using the MAP method for ammonia nitrogen removal. In addition, this study has adopted the Central Composite Design (CCD) in conjunction with the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and changed the operation conditions (mole ratio of PO43- and  Mg2+) to explore the effects of different operation conditions on the reaction variables of ammonia nitrogen removal and phosphate removal and evaluate the optimal operation conditions. Experiment results show that the concentration of phosphate has a significant effect on the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen. As the concentration of phosphate increases, the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen will also increase significantly. Under the condition of initial ammonia nitrogen concentration at 87 mg/L, the optimal mole ratio of n(NH4+) : n(PO43-) : n(Mg2+) is 1.00 : 1.75 : 1.67, and the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen can reach up to 81.9%. Through the second-degree polynomial of ammonia nitrogen removal rate obtained from the regression tree analysis, the calculation results are close to the actual experiment, so it can be used as reference for future plant applications. Further studies conducted to explore the effects of deionized water with prepared ammonia nitrogen and the effluent of joint wastewater treatment plants on the MAP method show that the other ions in the effluent of the joint wastewater treatment plants will cause the sedimentation and removal of PO43-, and interfere with the formation of MAP crystals, causing the decrease in ammonia nitrogen removal rate of PO43- at low mole ratios.

A Study on the Detection and Decomposition Techniques of Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide Components in High-Tech Industry Wastewater

  • Manager, AX Engineering Division (PhD in Environmental Engineering): Du Shi-Bin
  • Deputy Manager, AX Engineering Division (Masters in Environmental Engineering): Guo Zhi-Hao
  • Environmental Protection Division Technician, Southern Taiwan Science Park Administration: Guo Chong-Wen
  • Environmental Protection Division Chief, Southern Taiwan Science Park Administration: Chen Yu-Liang
  • Environmental Safety Section Chief, Southern Taiwan Science Park Administration: Lin Yong-Shou
  • Director, Southern Taiwan Science Park Administration: Chen Jun-Wei

- Abstract -
    The optoelectronics industry and the semiconductor industry are the major industries fostered and developed by the government in recent years, as well as the key players in the “Two Trillion and Twin Star Development Program” proposed by the government in 2002. In addition to creating an annual output value of over 500 billion New Taiwan Dollars and ranking top five in the world, the high-quality R&D and production capacities of Taiwan have allowed these industries to attract massive foreign investment turning Taiwan into one of the most investment intensive regions in the world while the Southern Taiwan Science Park has become a point of convergence for the aforementioned industries. These high-tech industries, due to production needs, often require the use of volatile organic solvents, such as Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), formula (CH3)2SO, Monoethanolamime (MEA), formula C2H5ONH2, Tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH), formula (CH3)4NOH, and other organic nitrogen and sulfuric substances as developing agents, stripper, cleaning agents. During the production process, specific organic solvents will be discharged with the wastewater while relevant studies have shown that TMAH will pose an inhibiting toxicity on microorganisms at high concentrations, and the current environmental inspections of the Environmental Protection Administration have not announced any detection methods of cations in the wastewater. In light of this, this study conducted a research on the detection of TMAH in the wastewater and the degradation techniques of aerobic organisms. The results show that ion chromatography can be used to conduct stable detection of TMAH concentration in the water while Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) simulation results show that the TMAH composition in the wastewater can be completely degraded by an aerobic biological treatment system under certain control conditions. Through the simulation plant tests and relevant detections, this study has identified the handling efficiency and command arguments of the various water quality indicators of the Southern Taiwan Science Park Wastewater Treatment Plant under relevant loads. In terms of technological aspects, this study can be used to provide a reference for the operation and management of industrial parks and Southern Taiwan Science Park, while in terms of administrative aspects, this study can also provide a reference for the Southern Taiwan Science Park Administration in the formulation of management policies and the collection of sewage system fees, and for the Wastewater Treatment Plant in the formulation of contingency plans.

A Study on the Production of Hydrogen and Methane through the Sequential Batch Anaerobic Digestion of Waste Organic Sludge

  • Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chang Jung Christian University: Lin Xin-Yi
  • Safety and Health Engineer, AX Engineering Division: Wang Chuang-Zheng
  • Graduate Student, Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chang Jung Christian University: Wang Zhong-Qi
  • Graduate Student, Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chang Jung Christian University: Zhuo Sheng-Yu

- Abstract -

     This study used the Sequential Batch Reactor (SBR) program to feed the waste sludge from the wastewater treatment plants of different industries into a two-phase sequential batch anaerobic digestion at 35℃ to study the gas and methane production efficiency of anaerobic digestion of organic matter in waste sludge. The first phase is the acid and hydrogen production reaction in which hydrogen is produced through the anaerobic digestion of sludge. The second phase is the methane production reaction, in which the source of the substrate is the organic sludge produced in the first phase. Bacteria strain is first subjected to heat screening treatment before implantation. From the experiment results, the initial concentration of the sludge feed from the four wastewater treatment plants, domestic sewage treatment plant, food factory, flour factory, and beer factory, is controlled at TS = 2%, with a hydrogen production rate range of 0.5~8 ml H2/hr, range of variance of hydrogen concentration of 0.2~1%.The hydrogen production rate of the domestic sewage plant, food factory, flour factory, and beer factory is 0.0875 mmol/L/day, 0.0626 mmol/L/day, 0.2049 mmol/L/day, and 0.0701 mmol/L/day respectively. The irregular hydrogen production speed shows that the hydrogen is almost converted in a short time. The hydrogen production volume per unit substrate of the flour factory is 0.082mmolH2/gCOD, higher than the other three factories but the sewage plant has the highest number of batches of hydrogen production and a hydrogen production rate within a stable range, and the maximum hydrogen production rate and maximum hydrogen production volume show the same trend. To summarize, sludge from floor factory > sludge from sewage plant > sludge from beer factory > sludge from food factory. The sewage plant has the highest concentration of methane produced from the sludge of the four wastewater treatment plants at 77.1% while the sludge from the flour factory has the highest methane production at 154.3 mL CH4/L-reactor/day. The COD removal rate is within the range of 15~30%, methane recycling rate between 50~70%. In this study of anaerobic digestion of sludge, the sludge from the flour factory has higher potential in terms of hydrogen and methane production.

A Feasibility Assessment of Wastewater Recycling in High-Tech Parks

  • Manager, AX Engineering Division (PhD in Environmental Engineering): Du Shi-Bin
  • Deputy Director, Southern Taiwan Science Park Administration: Chen Jun-Wei
  • Environmental Safety Section Chief, Southern Taiwan Science Park Administration: Lin Yong-Shou
  • Environmental Protection Division Chief, Southern Taiwan Science Park Administration: Chen Yu-Liang
  • Environmental Protection Division Senior Technician, Southern Taiwan Science Park Administration: Li Chiu-Ming
  • Project Engineer, AX Engineering Division (Masters in Environmental Engineering): Chen Ya-Jun

Proceedings of Industrial Safety and Environmental Protection Seminar of 2004, Southern Taiwan Science Park

- Abstract -

     Due to the rapid increase in population, rapid industrial development, and improvement of living standards, Taiwan currently faces an increasing demand for water resources. In order to solve the issues of water shortages, wastewater recycling is one of the pressing issues at hand. Through the water quality comparison between effluent processed by the three-level treatment of biological treatment by contact aeration, chemical coagulation and sedimentation, and filtration of wastewater from a certain high-tech industrial park in southern Taiwan and the water used for sprinkling, irrigation, flushing, industrial usage (cooling water, cleaning water, pure water, and boiler), drinking, and groundwater, this study explores the feasibility of recycling wastewater from industrial park wastewater treatment plants and reusing the water for secondary livelihood purposes and industrial production processes in the hopes of reducing the water costs of manufacturers and to ensure economic benefits.
     The assessment results show that, 1) the BOD5 in the treated water does not conform to the water quality standards required for sprinkling, irrigation, and toilet uses stipulated by the Water Resources Agency, MOEA. The Escherichia coli, lead, cadmium, and manganese levels do not conform to the water quality standards required for water used in soil treatment such as plant irrigation and dust inhibition stipulated in the soil treatment provisions in the Water Pollution Control Act.; 2) The SS, electrical conductivity, and total iron conform to the water quality standards required for cooling water and washing tower. The temperature and electrical conductivity does not meet the requirements for pure water; The pH value and phosphate level do not match the water quality requirements for boiler water.; 3) The TDS, Escherichia coli, Pb, Cd, Fe, Mn, F-, Cl-, and SO42- do not meet the standards for drinking water and water source, and the COD does not comply with the standards for drinking water and water source.; 4) The TDS, Pb, and Mn levels do not meet the monitoring standards for Type 2 groundwater but conform to the restriction standards for Type 2 groundwater.
     In conclusion of the preliminary assessment, although some of the water quality indicators of the treated water do not conform to the water quality standards required for sprinkling, irrigation, toilet water, industrial water (cooling, washing, pure water, and boiler water), drinking water source, the use of advanced wastewater treatment such as chlorination and disinfection, microfiltration, ion exchange resin and activated carbon adsorption together with the current water treatment technology will enable us to achieve the objectives of water recycling and reuse.

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